Monday, November 17th, 2014
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By Aubray Erhardt

As fall finally goes dim, winter emerges as the prevailing wind through the marketplace. While optimism serves as a white rose through this phase, moderate unemployment rates have given pause to overabundant optimism. All the same, the desire for homeownership remains high among those willing to absorb some risk while attracting enthusiasm.

In the Twin Cities region, for the week ending November 8:

• New Listings decreased 2.8% to 1,104
• Pending Sales increased 2.0% to 826
• Inventory increased 4.1% to 16,972

For the month of October:

• Median Sales Price increased 6.7% to $208,000
• Days on Market decreased 4.0% to 72
• Percent of Original List Price Received decreased 0.6% to 95.2%
• Months Supply of Inventory increased 13.5% to 4.2

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Monday, November 17th, 2014

As fall finally goes dim, winter emerges as the prevailing wind through the marketplace. While optimism serves as a white rose through this phase, moderate unemployment rates have given pause to overabundant optimism. All the same, the desire for homeownership remains high among those willing to absorb some risk while attracting enthusiasm.

In the Twin Cities region, for the week ending November 8:

  • New Listings decreased 2.8% to 1,104
  • Pending Sales increased 2.0% to 826
  • Inventory increased 4.1% to 16,972

For the month of October:

  • Median Sales Price increased 6.7% to $208,000
  • Days on Market decreased 4.0% to 72
  • Percent of Original List Price Received decreased 0.6% to 95.2%
  • Months Supply of Inventory increased 13.5% to 4.2

All comparisons are to 2013

Click here for the full Weekly Market Activity Report. From The Skinny Blog.

Posted in Weekly Report |
Monday, November 17th, 2014
In October 2014, overall buyer and seller activity both cooled slightly in the 13-county Minneapolis–St. Paul metropolitan area. Pending sales declined 1.3 percent from last year, while new listings decreased 2.3 percent.

Gains in traditional activity nearly offset dramatic declines in the foreclosure and short sale arena. Inventory levels rose 4.3 percent to 17,132 homes, providing buyers with more options. The median sales price rose 7.2 percent to $209,000, marking 32 consecutive months of year-over-year median price gains. Price per square foot rose 5.6 percent to $123.

The amount of time a home spends on the market fell 4.0 percent to 72 days, on average. Months’ supply of inventory rose 10.8 percent to 4.1 months, suggesting that the market is moving back toward balance after favoring sellers. The sales mix continued to skew toward traditional homes that sell in less time and at higher price points.

Despite an overall 2.3 percent decrease in seller activity, traditional new listings rose 6.7 percent while foreclosure and short sale new listings were down 42.4 and 31.3 percent, respectively. Similarly, overall closed sales were down 1.5 percent, but traditional closed sales rose 9.7 percent while foreclosure and short sale closings fell 41.1 and 48.3 percent. Market-wide inventory levels increased 4.3 percent, but traditional inventory was up 17.9 percent while foreclosure and short sale inventory levels declined 39.0 and 43.5 percent.

The Twin Cities housing affordability index of 188 means that the median household income was 88 percent higher than what’s necessary to qualify for the median-priced home given current interest rates. While the index is below its 2012 peak, it remains above its long-term average.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the Twin Cities has the lowest unemployment rate among major metros in the nation at about 3.8 percent. The national rate recently dropped below 6.0 percent for the first time since 2008.

From The Skinny Blog.

Posted in The Skinny |
Friday, November 14th, 2014
By Blanche Evans
November 14, 2014
There are two ways to build equity, or ownership, in your home. One is to pay what you owe your lender which reduces the principle owed on your mortgage, and the other is to take advantage of market upswings which increase the value of your home.

One way to build equity is to put more money down on the home you want to buy. Lenders have returned to tried and true models of income-to-debt ratios, requiring that borrowers put more money down when they purchase a home. While it's still possible to get zero-down loans, such as those offered by the VA, most loans with low down payments require mortgage insurance.

Click Here to Read More>>

Friday, November 14th, 2014
By Blanche Evans
November 14, 2014
There are two ways to build equity, or ownership, in your home. One is to pay what you owe your lender which reduces the principle owed on your mortgage, and the other is to take advantage of market upswings which increase the value of your home.

One way to build equity is to put more money down on the home you want to buy. Lenders have returned to tried and true models of income-to-debt ratios, requiring that borrowers put more money down when they purchase a home. While it's still possible to get zero-down loans, such as those offered by the VA, most loans with low down payments require mortgage insurance.

Click Here to Read More>>

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