Monday, January 7th, 2013

While you’re eating better and exercising more, also resolve to better understand the inner workings of your housing market. Data does not have to be daunting. Just from the existing trends, it’s safe to expect to see more homes selling in less time for closer to list price. It also looks like the single-family detached segment may recover faster than the condo-townhouse attached segment. It would be wise to watch foreclosure activity to see whether there will be fewer low-priced sales in 2013. Many patterns emerge if you look in the right places.

In the Twin Cities region, for the week ending December 22:

• New Listings increased 9.5% to 657
• Pending Sales increased 41.7% to 815
• Inventory decreased 29.2% to 13,315

For the month of November:

• Median Sales Price increased 16.4% to $172,287
• Days on Market decreased 26.5% to 103
• Percent of Original List Price Received increased 3.6% to 94.2%
• Months Supply of Inventory decreased 38.8% to 3.5

Click here for the full Weekly Market Activity Report from the Skinny

Posted in Weekly Market Activity Reports |
Wednesday, January 2nd, 2013


While you’re eating better and exercising more, also resolve to better understand the inner workings of your housing market. Data does not have to be daunting. Just from the existing trends, it’s safe to expect to see more homes selling in less time for closer to list price. It also looks like the single-family detached segment may recover faster than the condo-townhouse attached segment. It would be wise to watch foreclosure activity to see whether there will be fewer low-priced sales in 2013. Many patterns emerge if you look in the right places.

In the Twin Cities region, for the week ending December 22:

  • New Listings increased 9.5% to 657
  • Pending Sales increased 41.7% to 815
  • Inventory decreased 29.2% to 13,315

For the month of November:

  • Median Sales Price increased 16.4% to $172,287
  • Days on Market decreased 26.5% to 103
  • Percent of Original List Price Received increased 3.6% to 94.2%
  • Months Supply of Inventory decreased 38.8% to 3.5

Click here for the full Weekly Market Activity Report.From The Skinny.

Posted in Weekly Report |
Wednesday, January 2nd, 2013

By Tom Kraeutler

If you’re planning to sell your house any time soon, home improvements that build property value should be on your to-do list. It’s a buyer’s market, and between tighter purse strings and plenty of properties to choose from, shoppers want homes that are move-in ready and free of the need for home improvement projects that will add to their own bottom lines.

“There’s enough inventory out there right now that buyers can find what they like without having to compromise,” says Harrison Tulloss, a ZipRealty agent based in Raleigh, N.C. “They don’t have the money or inclination to put in a down payment, get a loan and then turn around and spend more cash to do exactly what they want to improve a property.”

Planning home improvements that pay you back at the time of sale requires a strategic vision as well as design, finish and product selections that welcome the widest possible range of buyer tastes. Drawing on tips from real estate pros, along with Remodeling magazine’s annual Cost vs. Value Report, here are 10 home improvements that pay you back when you sell.

Front entry doors: Curb appeal is the first step in a successful home sale, and installing a beautiful, high-quality entry door is a simple home improvement that delivers impact both in buyer drive-bys and online listings. A new entry door will also help lower home energy costs and stand up to weather extremes.

Attic bedroom: Converting an attic into useful living space is a smart way to add value and attract those shopping for multigenerational family homes. “Parents are moving in with their kids and vice versa, or people are combining their incomes to live in a bigger house,” says Renee Mayhall, RealEstate.com managing broker for the Carolinas. “So we see buyers focusing on properties with a higher number of bedrooms and baths to accommodate that.”

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Tuesday, January 1st, 2013

Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn’t do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover. ~Mark Twain

Monday, December 31st, 2012

Try a large remodeling project on your own and you could end up in one of these DIY nightmares.

By Lee Nelson

Your cousin says he can help you remodel your bathroom. He’s not a plumber and has absolutely no experience doing any carpentry work. But he’s cheap, so what could possibly go wrong?

A whole lot, actually – including your relationship if he messes up. Despite people’s best intentions, do-it-yourself (DIY) disasters happen all the time. And not knowing what you’re doing can not only be costly, but dangerous as well.

“Everyone wants to do some work themselves, and that’s okay. But you really should contact a professional ahead of time to see what your options are,” says Todd Sanwick, owner and president of Sanwick Remodeling Contractors in Omaha, Neb.

Before you tear down walls or purchase new tile, he emphasizes at least calling a contractor to determine your options. Doing so will give you some clue of what you will run into even if you don’t hire a professional, he says.

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